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20111001
20111031
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2011 11:00pm EDT
lasting impact on us as well. >> we will have time to delve into some of the elections later on. of the five bids he made, are any particularly significant? >> the 1912 bid is the high mark of socialism where he got 6% of the votes. a different election was 1920 where he was imprisoned in the atlanta penitentiary and got 1 million votes while running from prison. >> in our 90 minute program, "the contenders," we look at people who made an attempt at the white house and failed. but they had an effect on political and american history. we are live tonight from the eugene debs home in terre haute. it is on the campus of indiana state university. he lived here in this house. he and his wife kate, who lived here for years after he died. we will show you more of the house as we continue here. the top floor of the house has an interesting mural. the mural depicts the years of his public life. throughout our program we will be showing you aspects of the artwork to help illustrate eugene debs' story. let me introduce you to our second guest. she is joining us from what was his bedroom, now i
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2011 8:00pm EDT
the court's. >> why use? >> andrew jackson said that "he looks like god and talks like god." >> charles evans hughes -- the republican presidential nominee soon after the national convention. tonight, we looked at the life and legacy of charles evans hughes who was a two-term governor, secretary of state, and twice a supreme court justice. he was perhaps best known as one of the co-authors of the new deal. we're broadcasting live across from the capitol. he inaugurated this building when it first opened in 1935. let me introduce you to our guests this evening were joining us to talk about the life and legacy of charles evans hughes. my first guest is an historian, and bernadette higher -- bernadette tyler is a professor at cornell law school. i want you to set the stage for us. 1916, woodrow wilson wants to be reelected. frame what was going on in the country and the presidential campaign. >> president wilson said it would be a tragedy if his administration was defined by foriegn policy. it turned out to be just that. america starts his term focusing on the progressive era,
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2011 9:00pm EDT
that they were they would not share that with us. >> would phthalater tell you about that time? >> no. well, there was illusion to it. but one found out for one self-. >> what did you find out about that, tommy. what were they doing or others doing to try to protect your dad and your family? >> well, he had 24/7 protection and the card, a detective and a driver. i think it was later, the only incident that we did find out about was the missed opportunity to kill him. he had -- he went across the street 96th street where we live to have breakfast every morning and doug schultz had arranged to have the boys there on a morning. and it would have been curtains, except that day he got up early and went to the office so they missed it. and shortly there after, the boys took care of doug schultz. >> do you think you weren't aware of it because your dad didn't let him bother him? just kept to his routine? was that his personality? >> yes. >> he just went forward? >> right. >> it is said -- it's maybe an exaggeration. i remember doing research for the book that your dad had developed a
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2011 8:00pm EDT
this administration is following will lead us to the end of the road. i say that this course will lead us to economic disintegration and dictatorship. i say that we must substitute for the philosophy of spending, the philosophy of production. you cannot buy freedom. you must make freedom. [applause] >> from elwood, indiana, in august of 1940 to the west county's historical society here in russia vill, indiana. this is one of the postage stamps from 1992 -- a 75 cent stamp celebrating the centennial of wendell willkie's bert. amity shlaes is with the george washington institute in dallas tx. you have been a professor of history at indiana university. let me begin with that speech he gave in elwood indiana -- elwood, india. it's as the groundwork for why he was challenging franklin delano roosevelt. >> he ran against roosevelt and the new deal and against the tide of policies and politics represented by the new deal. we will have a good opportunity to talk about those in detail. it was a fairly standard political speech, but not a fairly standard political rally. it was a massive ra
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2011 8:00pm EDT
, set the scene for us to begin. 1928 -- the united states. what was going on in this country? what are some of the issues we will be discussing? >> the 1928 election is one of the most interesting and also what of the most vicious elections in american history. we have two candidates who really embodied two different americas that are coming into conflict in the election. al smith is urban, he is from new york city. he is an irishman. he is catholic. he represents a kind of immigrant, urban a barakat that has come of age in the last 30 years. on the other side, we have herbert hoover who in many ways can hardly be more different than al smith. he is from the midwest. he is from iowa. he is very straitlaced. he is not our bid. if he is pious. he wears starchy colors. these two mena really encapsule some of the most important cultural class is of that moment. clashes over prohibition. to some degree, clashes over the economy. in many ways, this turns out to be a cultural selection that hinders on which of these two americas is the america that will be voted into office. >> it was sai
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)